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Collective mural NOUS/MAMO (Cree) / NINAN (Atikamekw) at the First Nations Garden

Collective mural NOUS/MAMO (Cree) / NINAN (Atikamekw) at the First Nations Garden

During National Aboriginal Day and the summer solstice, on June 21, the First Nations Garden will be inaugurating an ephemeral mural. Artist Isabelle Anguita will present a collective work involving different organizations dedicated to Canadian natives, whose goal is to foster enriching encounters with people from precarious social environments who, as a rule, do not have access to intercultural artistic projects.

A work of art that brings people together

Isabelle Anguita, who possesses great experience in cultural mediation, designed and coordinated this project. The painter has visual-arts training and lives in Montréal. Her mural project endeavors to bring populations who are marginalized or who are at the risk of exclusion closer to the creation process. Invited to get-togethers in different places – Native Friendship Centre, Chez Doris, Northern Québec Module, Native Women’s Shelter of Montréal – the participants are doing a collage of recycled fabric and paper evoking the patterns of blankets used by various First Nations, but also those of more European tradition, such as quilts, imported to North America. This artistic project will be the opportunity to showcase the great traditional and contemporary knowhow of native peoples and other cultures. The immense collage in the form of a blanket will be on display at the First Nations Garden from June 21 to October 31. The project is taking place in partnership with Exeko, a charitable organization based in Montréal since 2006 and whose mission is to promote, through innovation in culture and in education, the inclusion and development of the most marginalized citizens.

A day to celebrate Mother Earth

National Aboriginal Day is extremely important for all First Nations, who at this time call attention to the renewal of the seasons and the power of the sun, rich in energy and true source of life. For thousands of years, highly elaborate rituals and ceremonies have been held to thank Mother Earth and her generous bounty, and to pay tribute to the ancestors. Across the country, native people celebrate this moment of the year when the day is longest. There is singing, dancing, offerings are made, a good meal is shared – and everyone’s invited.

Celebration of the solstice

At the First Nations Garden, this year, we’re celebrating the day with exceptional guests. In the morning a ceremony will take place with Grandfather Dominik Rankin and Marie-Josée Tardif, a student who follows his teachings. Both will be inviting us into the Healing Circle around the sacred fire, so that we may gather and express our gratitude at the arrival of summer.

Listening to a legend under the shaputuan

Sylvain Rivard has a number of talents: he’s a storyteller, dancer, singer and visual artist, and has published several stories with his own illustrations. He’ll beguile the whole family with Abenaki tales while creating a little something else connected to the narrative.

More about the activities

 

 

 

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