Languages

Global menu

Orthoptera

English

Snowy tree cricket

English
Oecanthus fultoni

Snowy tree crickets are pale green, with an orange-yellow marking on the top of the head and long antennae. There are two dark spots at the base of the antennae. The wings are transparent, with fine white veins. The males have wider wings than the females. These insects are 13 to 15 mm long.

Marsh meadow grasshopper

English
Chorthippus curtipennis

These crickets may be various shades of yellow, green and brown. Their legs are often reddish, with black joints on the hindlegs.

The males are smaller than the females: 12 to 20 mm long for the males and 20 to 35 for the females. The males’ wings are long, reaching to the tip of the abdomen, while the wings of the flightless females cover only three-quarters of the abdomen. They have fairly short, thread-like antennae.

Oblong-winged katydid

English
Amblycorypha oblongifolia

These green crickets are 40 to 52 mm long. When populations are dense, it may be possible to find some yellow or bright pink individuals. As in other members of the Tettigoniidae, their antennae are longer than their bodies. The oblong, fairly wide wings also extend past the abdomen. The head is rounded on top and there is a large space between the antennae at their base. The legs are long.

The female has a laterally flattened ovipositor (egg-laying organ).

Crickets

English

Crickets are black or brown insects over 13 mm long. They have long antennae, two compound eyes and grinding mouthparts. They have two pairs of many-veined wings on the thorax. The forewings are fairly tough. They protect the membranous hindwings, which are folded in a fan shape when at rest. Of the three sets of legs, the hindmost legs are the most noticeable, since they are adapted for jumping. Their femurs are particularly strong. Crickets have two sensory appendages called cerci at the tip of the abdomen.

Females have an ovipositor, a long cylindrical egg-laying organ, between the cerci.

House crickets

English
Acheta domesticus

House crickets are yellowish-brown, with dark lines on the head, long antennae, two compound eyes and grinding mouthparts. They have two pairs of many-veined wings on the thorax. The forewings are fairly tough. They protect the membranous hindwings, which are folded in a fan shape when at rest. Of the three sets of legs, the hindmost legs are the most noticeable, since they are adapted for jumping. Their femurs are particularly strong. Crickets have two sensory appendages called cerci at the tip of the abdomen.

Females have an ovipositor, a long cylindrical egg-laying organ, between the cerci.

Acheta domesticus

English

Description

Along with locusts and grasshoppers, crickets belong to the leaping insect family. They have short, strong hind legs. The antennae are long and slender. They have two sensory filaments, called cerci, at the tip of their abdomens. Females have a long egg-laying organ, called an ovipositor, between these two sensory organs. House crickets are over 13 mm long.

Subscribe to RSS - Orthoptera