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  • September 23, 2019

Planets visible to the naked eye - September 23, 2019

  • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
Photo: Sophie Desrosiers
Planets visible to the naked eye

From September 23 to October 7, 2019

Mercury is lost in the glare of the sun and is not visible at the moment. The tiny planet passed on the far side of the sun (superior conjunction) on September 3, and will return to the evening sky for a poor apparition around mid-October.

Venus is lost in the glare of the sun and is not visible at the moment. The bright planet will gradually reappear in the evening sky during October. With binoculars, scan the west-southwest horizon, 20 minutes after sunset: When will you catch your first glimpse of the Evening Star?

Mars passed behind the sun (solar conjunction) on September 2, and gradually reappears in the dawn sky during the first week of October. Look due east for the Red Planet, just above the horizon, 45 minutes before sunrise.

Jupiter shines brightly in the southwest during the evening. The Giant Planet appears during twilight, some 18 degrees above the south-southwest horizon, and then descends toward the southwest horizon where it sets around 9:30 p.m. On the evening of October 3, the crescent Moon hangs just 1 ½ degrees to the upper left of Jupiter.

Saturn is also easy to see during the evening. The Ringed Planet appears during evening twilight 22 degrees high in the south, and sets in the southwest around midnight. The first quarter Moon shines just 2 degrees to the lower left of Saturn during the evening of October 5.

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