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Planets visible to the naked eye

  • Photo: Marc Jobin
    Planets visible to the naked eye

    Here's a look at the planets that will be observable with the naked eye in the coming days. Follow these guidelines to find out where and when to look for them.

    From April 15 to 29, 2024

    Mercury passed between Earth and the Sun (inferior conjunction) on April 11. The tiny planet will gradually reappear at dawn for an unfavourable apparition between May 1st and June 1st.

    Venus is now too close to the Sun and is lost in the glare of our star. The planet will pass behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on June 4, and will gradually reappear as the Evening star in July.

    Mars is emerging from behind the Sun and gradually reappears in the morning sky. Use binoculars to locate the faint Red Planet, very low in the east-southeast at dawn, 45 minutes before sunrise. Saturn shines a few degrees to its upper right, with the gap between the two planets increasing day by day.

    Jupiter gets closer to the Sun and lower on the horizon with each passing evening. The bright (magnitude –2.0) Giant Planet appears at dusk a dozen degrees above the western horizon and sets in the west-northwest around 9:00 p.m. Jupiter will become lost in the Sun’s glare at the end of April.

    Saturn gradually reappears at dawn. Look for the Ringed Planet low in the east-southeast, 45 minutes before sunrise. Saturn is somewhat faint presently and binoculars will help in locating it. Mars shines a few degrees to its lower left, with the gap between the two planets increasing day by day.

    See also

    Monthly Sky

    The Pocket Planetarium

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